Archive for category mac

20 Free Mac Apps For Web Designer’s Toolkit

Professional web designers on the Mac platform rely on commercial heavy-hitters like Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, Fireworks, and InDesign for their graphic design needs. And when it’s time to slice and dice, some depend on the excellent Dreamweaver CS4 for WYSIWYG design/development; while many Mac code jockeys swear only by editors like Coda, BBEdit or TextMate. Others prefer to mix, match or blend. Designers also rely on various supporting apps to accomplish every day jobs like FTP uploading, cross-browser testing (important if you’re designing/developing on a Mac platform only), screen-shot snapping, pixel measuring, and the like. While many of these programs are slick, they also of course cost … money. Which brings us to free apps for the Mac crowd. Which are the best compared to their commercial counterparts? Or are simply great apps in a league all their own? Put away that credit card for now and let’s find out! Free Photoshop alternative GIMP (Mac) In a nutshell, GIMP provides designers with the power to accomplish almost any task that Adobe Photoshop is used for. Mac users familiar with typical Cocoa apps will find GIMP’s interface and menu system very “un-Mac” like (requiring the X Window System, commonly called X11), but if you soldier through you’ll find a powerful image editing program with all the fixins – advanced multi-layering, text and image effects, pro-level image manipulation, and a full range of design tools. High quality plug-ins are freely available to extend the app, including the ability to use some native Photoshop ones. Also check out: Seashore Based on GIMP, Seashore is a pure cocoa app which makes it very OS X friendly. A range of tools for gradients, textures, layers, and drawing are found in Seashore. However, the program lacks many of GIMPs more powerful features so it’s not exactly a GIMP replacement either. LiveQuartz Sporting a sleek Mac interface, LiveQuartz describes itself as a “simple and powerful free photo editor for Leopard.” It does two thing very well: layers and filters. Basic drawing tools are also included but, as with Seashore, it’s not billed as a Photoshop replacement either. In the hands of the right designer, however, fairly sophisticated designs can be created with this nice app, which is also fun to use. Free Illustrator alternative InkScape (Mac) The open-source InkScape, another Mac application that requires X11, is a viable alternative to Adobe Illustrator with its ability to create and edit graphics in scalable vector format. AI users will feel at home using InkScape with options like layer control, gradients, connector path control/manipulation, various brushes (including calligraphy), type effects, masking, EPS exporting, a 3-D shape tool, object tweaking/sculpting, and even a diagram connector tool useful for a variety of purposes, like creating site maps. Depending on the complexity of your design, files can be exported from InkScape and into Illustrator and vice-versa. Free Dreamweaver alternative KompoZer (Mac) Featuring WYSIWYG website creation and robust CSS editing, KompoZer is a mature, open-source alternative similar to Adobe Dreamweaver on the Mac, and has many of the same bells and whistles, too. Although it can’t top Dreamweaver’s rich offerings, KompoZer offers full CSS support, code viewing/editing, tabbed views, FTP site management, a color picker, clickable hierarchical properties view bar for code isolation, split views, live preview, and much more. There is even the option to call W3C’s HTML validator to check for valid markup. KompoZer is built on the NVU architecture, but is less buggy and more feature-rich than NVU since development on that project was stopped and has been replaced by KompoZer. Also check out: SeaMonkey For creating very simple web pages. Amaya A project started by W3C, Amaya aims to be a WYSIWYG editor for standards compliant web developers, but lacks KompoZer’s power. It also claims to be a web browser, but will likely not pass muster for most people’s normal web browsing activities. Free InDesign alternative Scribus (Mac) This open-source page layout program for the Mac, similar to Adobe InDesign , is geared towards print professionals in creating business cards, ads, magazines, newsletters, brochures, posters, signs, or just about any other kind of printed material. Although the application doesn’t allow for measurements in pixels, web designers can still take advantage of Scribus’s multi-page capabilities, master pages, and precise typographic control for quickly generating rough ideas for web banners, buttons, or even website mockups faster than you can say Photoshop! The ability to create PDFs within Scribus (including interactive ones) is another plus. Image export options include PNG, EPS, and PDF. Free Mac text/coding editors TextWrangler (Mac) A powerful general purpose text/code editor for OS X, TextWrangler has many of the same pro features found in commercial editors, such as multi-file search and replace, open/save in various line-ending formats and character sets, find/compare/merge file differences, hard/soft text wrap views, FTP/SFTP support, tabbed viewing, and more. Simple CSS (Mac) Simple CSS sports a Mac-friendly interface that helps you point and click your way to building CSS stylesheets . One column allows for style creation, and a main window gives you complete control over fonts, displays, borders, and box dimensions. Multiple projects can be opened simultaneously, and styles are displayed via a WYSIWYG pane. Finalized CSS code can then be previewed and exported. Firebug (Mac Firefox plug-in) A must-have Firefox extension for web developers, Firebug offers an impressive array of features for live in-browser code viewing, testing, editing, and debugging of HTML, CSS, and Javascript. Firebug easily overrides HTML and CSS on any webpage for live previewing in Firefox – saving you precious design/development time. A DOM inspector adds to the extension’s impressive capabilities. Free cross-browser and server-testing apps VirtualBox (Mac) VirtualBox sets up a professional virtualization environment on your Mac, similar to Parallels or Fusion, allowing you to install Windows XP, Vista, Windows 7 and others. But if you just need a Windows environment for browser testing on your Mac, the good news is that you don’t even need a licensed copy of Windows to run IE6, IE7, or IE8. VirtualBox can be configured to run all three browsers by installing the VirtualPC disc images (for free) directly from Microsoft. Adobe BrowserLab (Mac/PC) This free online screenshot service (still in beta) shows you what your latest web design will look like on the PC side in IE’s 6, 7, 8 and Firefox; and on the Mac side in Safari and Firefox. Although it only takes static screenshots, BrowserLab is useful for catching pesky CSS layout issues, especially with the difficult-to-justify-installing-but-still-important IE6.

20 Free Mac Apps For Web Designer’s Toolkit

Professional web designers on the Mac platform rely on commercial heavy-hitters like Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, Fireworks, and InDesign for their graphic design needs. And when it’s time to slice and dice, some depend on the excellent Dreamweaver CS4 for WYSIWYG design/development; while many Mac code jockeys swear only by editors like Coda, BBEdit or TextMate. Others prefer to mix, match or blend. Designers also rely on various supporting apps to accomplish every day jobs like FTP uploading, cross-browser testing (important if you’re designing/developing on a Mac platform only), screen-shot snapping, pixel measuring, and the like. While many of these programs are slick, they also of course cost … money. Which brings us to free apps for the Mac crowd. Which are the best compared to their commercial counterparts? Or are simply great apps in a league all their own? Put away that credit card for now and let’s find out! Free Photoshop alternative GIMP (Mac) In a nutshell, GIMP provides designers with the power to accomplish almost any task that Adobe Photoshop is used for. Mac users familiar with typical Cocoa apps will find GIMP’s interface and menu system very “un-Mac” like (requiring the X Window System, commonly called X11), but if you soldier through you’ll find a powerful image editing program with all the fixins – advanced multi-layering, text and image effects, pro-level image manipulation, and a full range of design tools. High quality plug-ins are freely available to extend the app, including the ability to use some native Photoshop ones. Also check out: Seashore Based on GIMP, Seashore is a pure cocoa app which makes it very OS X friendly. A range of tools for gradients, textures, layers, and drawing are found in Seashore. However, the program lacks many of GIMPs more powerful features so it’s not exactly a GIMP replacement either. LiveQuartz Sporting a sleek Mac interface, LiveQuartz describes itself as a “simple and powerful free photo editor for Leopard.” It does two thing very well: layers and filters. Basic drawing tools are also included but, as with Seashore, it’s not billed as a Photoshop replacement either. In the hands of the right designer, however, fairly sophisticated designs can be created with this nice app, which is also fun to use. Free Illustrator alternative InkScape (Mac) The open-source InkScape, another Mac application that requires X11, is a viable alternative to Adobe Illustrator with its ability to create and edit graphics in scalable vector format. AI users will feel at home using InkScape with options like layer control, gradients, connector path control/manipulation, various brushes (including calligraphy), type effects, masking, EPS exporting, a 3-D shape tool, object tweaking/sculpting, and even a diagram connector tool useful for a variety of purposes, like creating site maps. Depending on the complexity of your design, files can be exported from InkScape and into Illustrator and vice-versa. Free Dreamweaver alternative KompoZer (Mac) Featuring WYSIWYG website creation and robust CSS editing, KompoZer is a mature, open-source alternative similar to Adobe Dreamweaver on the Mac, and has many of the same bells and whistles, too. Although it can’t top Dreamweaver’s rich offerings, KompoZer offers full CSS support, code viewing/editing, tabbed views, FTP site management, a color picker, clickable hierarchical properties view bar for code isolation, split views, live preview, and much more. There is even the option to call W3C’s HTML validator to check for valid markup. KompoZer is built on the NVU architecture, but is less buggy and more feature-rich than NVU since development on that project was stopped and has been replaced by KompoZer. Also check out: SeaMonkey For creating very simple web pages. Amaya A project started by W3C, Amaya aims to be a WYSIWYG editor for standards compliant web developers, but lacks KompoZer’s power. It also claims to be a web browser, but will likely not pass muster for most people’s normal web browsing activities. Free InDesign alternative Scribus (Mac) This open-source page layout program for the Mac, similar to Adobe InDesign , is geared towards print professionals in creating business cards, ads, magazines, newsletters, brochures, posters, signs, or just about any other kind of printed material. Although the application doesn’t allow for measurements in pixels, web designers can still take advantage of Scribus’s multi-page capabilities, master pages, and precise typographic control for quickly generating rough ideas for web banners, buttons, or even website mockups faster than you can say Photoshop! The ability to create PDFs within Scribus (including interactive ones) is another plus. Image export options include PNG, EPS, and PDF. Free Mac text/coding editors TextWrangler (Mac) A powerful general purpose text/code editor for OS X, TextWrangler has many of the same pro features found in commercial editors, such as multi-file search and replace, open/save in various line-ending formats and character sets, find/compare/merge file differences, hard/soft text wrap views, FTP/SFTP support, tabbed viewing, and more. Simple CSS (Mac) Simple CSS sports a Mac-friendly interface that helps you point and click your way to building CSS stylesheets . One column allows for style creation, and a main window gives you complete control over fonts, displays, borders, and box dimensions. Multiple projects can be opened simultaneously, and styles are displayed via a WYSIWYG pane. Finalized CSS code can then be previewed and exported. Firebug (Mac Firefox plug-in) A must-have Firefox extension for web developers, Firebug offers an impressive array of features for live in-browser code viewing, testing, editing, and debugging of HTML, CSS, and Javascript. Firebug easily overrides HTML and CSS on any webpage for live previewing in Firefox – saving you precious design/development time. A DOM inspector adds to the extension’s impressive capabilities.

20 Free Mac Apps For Web Designer’s Toolkit

Professional web designers on the Mac platform rely on commercial heavy-hitters like Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, Fireworks, and InDesign for their graphic design needs. And when it’s time to slice and dice, some depend on the excellent Dreamweaver CS4 for WYSIWYG design/development; while many Mac code jockeys swear only by editors like Coda, BBEdit or TextMate. Others prefer to mix, match or blend. Designers also rely on various supporting apps to accomplish every day jobs like FTP uploading, cross-browser testing (important if you’re designing/developing on a Mac platform only), screen-shot snapping, pixel measuring, and the like. While many of these programs are slick, they also of course cost … money. Which brings us to free apps for the Mac crowd. Which are the best compared to their commercial counterparts? Or are simply great apps in a league all their own? Put away that credit card for now and let’s find out! Free Photoshop alternative GIMP (Mac) In a nutshell, GIMP provides designers with the power to accomplish almost any task that Adobe Photoshop is used for. Mac users familiar with typical Cocoa apps will find GIMP’s interface and menu system very “un-Mac” like (requiring the X Window System, commonly called X11), but if you soldier through you’ll find a powerful image editing program with all the fixins – advanced multi-layering, text and image effects, pro-level image manipulation, and a full range of design tools. High quality plug-ins are freely available to extend the app, including the ability to use some native Photoshop ones. Also check out: Seashore Based on GIMP, Seashore is a pure cocoa app which makes it very OS X friendly. A range of tools for gradients, textures, layers, and drawing are found in Seashore. However, the program lacks many of GIMPs more powerful features so it’s not exactly a GIMP replacement either. LiveQuartz Sporting a sleek Mac interface, LiveQuartz describes itself as a “simple and powerful free photo editor for Leopard.” It does two thing very well: layers and filters. Basic drawing tools are also included but, as with Seashore, it’s not billed as a Photoshop replacement either. In the hands of the right designer, however, fairly sophisticated designs can be created with this nice app, which is also fun to use. Free Illustrator alternative InkScape (Mac) The open-source InkScape, another Mac application that requires X11, is a viable alternative to Adobe Illustrator with its ability to create and edit graphics in scalable vector format. AI users will feel at home using InkScape with options like layer control, gradients, connector path control/manipulation, various brushes (including calligraphy), type effects, masking, EPS exporting, a 3-D shape tool, object tweaking/sculpting, and even a diagram connector tool useful for a variety of purposes, like creating site maps. Depending on the complexity of your design, files can be exported from InkScape and into Illustrator and vice-versa. Free Dreamweaver alternative KompoZer (Mac) Featuring WYSIWYG website creation and robust CSS editing, KompoZer is a mature, open-source alternative similar to Adobe Dreamweaver on the Mac, and has many of the same bells and whistles, too. Although it can’t top Dreamweaver’s rich offerings, KompoZer offers full CSS support, code viewing/editing, tabbed views, FTP site management, a color picker, clickable hierarchical properties view bar for code isolation, split views, live preview, and much more. There is even the option to call W3C’s HTML validator to check for valid markup. KompoZer is built on the NVU architecture, but is less buggy and more feature-rich than NVU since development on that project was stopped and has been replaced by KompoZer. Also check out: SeaMonkey For creating very simple web pages. Amaya A project started by W3C, Amaya aims to be a WYSIWYG editor for standards compliant web developers, but lacks KompoZer’s power

20 Free Mac Apps For Web Designer’s Toolkit

Professional web designers on the Mac platform rely on commercial heavy-hitters like Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, Fireworks, and InDesign for their graphic design needs. And when it’s time to slice and dice, some depend on the excellent Dreamweaver CS4 for WYSIWYG design/development; while many Mac code jockeys swear only by editors like Coda, BBEdit or TextMate. Others prefer to mix, match or blend. Designers also rely on various supporting apps to accomplish every day jobs like FTP uploading, cross-browser testing (important if you’re designing/developing on a Mac platform only), screen-shot snapping, pixel measuring, and the like. While many of these programs are slick, they also of course cost … money. Which brings us to free apps for the Mac crowd. Which are the best compared to their commercial counterparts? Or are simply great apps in a league all their own? Put away that credit card for now and let’s find out! Free Photoshop alternative GIMP (Mac) In a nutshell, GIMP provides designers with the power to accomplish almost any task that Adobe Photoshop is used for. Mac users familiar with typical Cocoa apps will find GIMP’s interface and menu system very “un-Mac” like (requiring the X Window System, commonly called X11), but if you soldier through you’ll find a powerful image editing program with all the fixins – advanced multi-layering, text and image effects, pro-level image manipulation, and a full range of design tools. High quality plug-ins are freely available to extend the app, including the ability to use some native Photoshop ones. Also check out: Seashore Based on GIMP, Seashore is a pure cocoa app which makes it very OS X friendly. A range of tools for gradients, textures, layers, and drawing are found in Seashore. However, the program lacks many of GIMPs more powerful features so it’s not exactly a GIMP replacement either. LiveQuartz Sporting a sleek Mac interface, LiveQuartz describes itself as a “simple and powerful free photo editor for Leopard.” It does two thing very well: layers and filters. Basic drawing tools are also included but, as with Seashore, it’s not billed as a Photoshop replacement either. In the hands of the right designer, however, fairly sophisticated designs can be created with this nice app, which is also fun to use. Free Illustrator alternative InkScape (Mac) The open-source InkScape, another Mac application that requires X11, is a viable alternative to Adobe Illustrator with its ability to create and edit graphics in scalable vector format. AI users will feel at home using InkScape with options like layer control, gradients, connector path control/manipulation, various brushes (including calligraphy), type effects, masking, EPS exporting, a 3-D shape tool, object tweaking/sculpting, and even a diagram connector tool useful for a variety of purposes, like creating site maps. Depending on the complexity of your design, files can be exported from InkScape and into Illustrator and vice-versa. Free Dreamweaver alternative KompoZer (Mac) Featuring WYSIWYG website creation and robust CSS editing, KompoZer is a mature, open-source alternative similar to Adobe Dreamweaver on the Mac, and has many of the same bells and whistles, too. Although it can’t top Dreamweaver’s rich offerings, KompoZer offers full CSS support, code viewing/editing, tabbed views, FTP site management, a color picker, clickable hierarchical properties view bar for code isolation, split views, live preview, and much more. There is even the option to call W3C’s HTML validator to check for valid markup. KompoZer is built on the NVU architecture, but is less buggy and more feature-rich than NVU since development on that project was stopped and has been replaced by KompoZer. Also check out: SeaMonkey For creating very simple web pages. Amaya A project started by W3C, Amaya aims to be a WYSIWYG editor for standards compliant web developers, but lacks KompoZer’s power. It also claims to be a web browser, but will likely not pass muster for most people’s normal web browsing activities. Free InDesign alternative Scribus (Mac) This open-source page layout program for the Mac, similar to Adobe InDesign , is geared towards print professionals in creating business cards, ads, magazines, newsletters, brochures, posters, signs, or just about any other kind of printed material. Although the application doesn’t allow for measurements in pixels, web designers can still take advantage of Scribus’s multi-page capabilities, master pages, and precise typographic control for quickly generating rough ideas for web banners, buttons, or even website mockups faster than you can say Photoshop! The ability to create PDFs within Scribus (including interactive ones) is another plus. Image export options include PNG, EPS, and PDF. Free Mac text/coding editors TextWrangler (Mac) A powerful general purpose text/code editor for OS X, TextWrangler has many of the same pro features found in commercial editors, such as multi-file search and replace, open/save in various line-ending formats and character sets, find/compare/merge file differences, hard/soft text wrap views, FTP/SFTP support, tabbed viewing, and more. Simple CSS (Mac) Simple CSS sports a Mac-friendly interface that helps you point and click your way to building CSS stylesheets . One column allows for style creation, and a main window gives you complete control over fonts, displays, borders, and box dimensions. Multiple projects can be opened simultaneously, and styles are displayed via a WYSIWYG pane. Finalized CSS code can then be previewed and exported. Firebug (Mac Firefox plug-in) A must-have Firefox extension for web developers, Firebug offers an impressive array of features for live in-browser code viewing, testing, editing, and debugging of HTML, CSS, and Javascript. Firebug easily overrides HTML and CSS on any webpage for live previewing in Firefox – saving you precious design/development time. A DOM inspector adds to the extension’s impressive capabilities. Free cross-browser and server-testing apps VirtualBox (Mac) VirtualBox sets up a professional virtualization environment on your Mac, similar to Parallels or Fusion, allowing you to install Windows XP, Vista, Windows 7 and others. But if you just need a Windows environment for browser testing on your Mac, the good news is that you don’t even need a licensed copy of Windows to run IE6, IE7, or IE8. VirtualBox can be configured to run all three browsers by installing the VirtualPC disc images (for free) directly from Microsoft

20 Free Mac Apps For Web Designer’s Toolkit

Professional web designers on the Mac platform rely on commercial heavy-hitters like Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, Fireworks, and InDesign for their graphic design needs. And when it’s time to slice and dice, some depend on the excellent Dreamweaver CS4 for WYSIWYG design/development; while many Mac code jockeys swear only by editors like Coda, BBEdit or TextMate. Others prefer to mix, match or blend. Designers also rely on various supporting apps to accomplish every day jobs like FTP uploading, cross-browser testing (important if you’re designing/developing on a Mac platform only), screen-shot snapping, pixel measuring, and the like. While many of these programs are slick, they also of course cost … money. Which brings us to free apps for the Mac crowd. Which are the best compared to their commercial counterparts? Or are simply great apps in a league all their own? Put away that credit card for now and let’s find out! Free Photoshop alternative GIMP (Mac) In a nutshell, GIMP provides designers with the power to accomplish almost any task that Adobe Photoshop is used for. Mac users familiar with typical Cocoa apps will find GIMP’s interface and menu system very “un-Mac” like (requiring the X Window System, commonly called X11), but if you soldier through you’ll find a powerful image editing program with all the fixins – advanced multi-layering, text and image effects, pro-level image manipulation, and a full range of design tools. High quality plug-ins are freely available to extend the app, including the ability to use some native Photoshop ones. Also check out: Seashore Based on GIMP, Seashore is a pure cocoa app which makes it very OS X friendly. A range of tools for gradients, textures, layers, and drawing are found in Seashore. However, the program lacks many of GIMPs more powerful features so it’s not exactly a GIMP replacement either. LiveQuartz Sporting a sleek Mac interface, LiveQuartz describes itself as a “simple and powerful free photo editor for Leopard.” It does two thing very well: layers and filters. Basic drawing tools are also included but, as with Seashore, it’s not billed as a Photoshop replacement either. In the hands of the right designer, however, fairly sophisticated designs can be created with this nice app, which is also fun to use. Free Illustrator alternative InkScape (Mac) The open-source InkScape, another Mac application that requires X11, is a viable alternative to Adobe Illustrator with its ability to create and edit graphics in scalable vector format. AI users will feel at home using InkScape with options like layer control, gradients, connector path control/manipulation, various brushes (including calligraphy), type effects, masking, EPS exporting, a 3-D shape tool, object tweaking/sculpting, and even a diagram connector tool useful for a variety of purposes, like creating site maps. Depending on the complexity of your design, files can be exported from InkScape and into Illustrator and vice-versa. Free Dreamweaver alternative KompoZer (Mac) Featuring WYSIWYG website creation and robust CSS editing, KompoZer is a mature, open-source alternative similar to Adobe Dreamweaver on the Mac, and has many of the same bells and whistles, too. Although it can’t top Dreamweaver’s rich offerings, KompoZer offers full CSS support, code viewing/editing, tabbed views, FTP site management, a color picker, clickable hierarchical properties view bar for code isolation, split views, live preview, and much more. There is even the option to call W3C’s HTML validator to check for valid markup. KompoZer is built on the NVU architecture, but is less buggy and more feature-rich than NVU since development on that project was stopped and has been replaced by KompoZer. Also check out: SeaMonkey For creating very simple web pages. Amaya A project started by W3C, Amaya aims to be a WYSIWYG editor for standards compliant web developers, but lacks KompoZer’s power. It also claims to be a web browser, but will likely not pass muster for most people’s normal web browsing activities. Free InDesign alternative Scribus (Mac) This open-source page layout program for the Mac, similar to Adobe InDesign , is geared towards print professionals in creating business cards, ads, magazines, newsletters, brochures, posters, signs, or just about any other kind of printed material. Although the application doesn’t allow for measurements in pixels, web designers can still take advantage of Scribus’s multi-page capabilities, master pages, and precise typographic control for quickly generating rough ideas for web banners, buttons, or even website mockups faster than you can say Photoshop! The ability to create PDFs within Scribus (including interactive ones) is another plus. Image export options include PNG, EPS, and PDF. Free Mac text/coding editors TextWrangler (Mac) A powerful general purpose text/code editor for OS X, TextWrangler has many of the same pro features found in commercial editors, such as multi-file search and replace, open/save in various line-ending formats and character sets, find/compare/merge file differences, hard/soft text wrap views, FTP/SFTP support, tabbed viewing, and more. Simple CSS (Mac) Simple CSS sports a Mac-friendly interface that helps you point and click your way to building CSS stylesheets . One column allows for style creation, and a main window gives you complete control over fonts, displays, borders, and box dimensions. Multiple projects can be opened simultaneously, and styles are displayed via a WYSIWYG pane. Finalized CSS code can then be previewed and exported. Firebug (Mac Firefox plug-in) A must-have Firefox extension for web developers, Firebug offers an impressive array of features for live in-browser code viewing, testing, editing, and debugging of HTML, CSS, and Javascript. Firebug easily overrides HTML and CSS on any webpage for live previewing in Firefox – saving you precious design/development time. A DOM inspector adds to the extension’s impressive capabilities. Free cross-browser and server-testing apps VirtualBox (Mac) VirtualBox sets up a professional virtualization environment on your Mac, similar to Parallels or Fusion, allowing you to install Windows XP, Vista, Windows 7 and others. But if you just need a Windows environment for browser testing on your Mac, the good news is that you don’t even need a licensed copy of Windows to run IE6, IE7, or IE8. VirtualBox can be configured to run all three browsers by installing the VirtualPC disc images (for free) directly from Microsoft. Adobe BrowserLab (Mac/PC) This free online screenshot service (still in beta) shows you what your latest web design will look like on the PC side in IE’s 6, 7, 8 and Firefox; and on the Mac side in Safari and Firefox. Although it only takes static screenshots, BrowserLab is useful for catching pesky CSS layout issues, especially with the difficult-to-justify-installing-but-still-important IE6